Lindsay Marie Stewart
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Campus Life

Hangzhou, China. 2015. On both a global scale as well as for many young Chinese, everything in adult life starts in university. Although lasting only a few years, it often has a long term influence on their lives as they establish their future aspirations, form relationships, and create an identity. University students as a group are a large representative of Chinese youth; as the next generation, they will be the ones to develop and revitalize China. 

Campus Life

Produced by: Lindsay Marie Stewart & Lindsay Seguin

Directed & Edited by: Lindsay Marie Stewart

Our next generation will have more
freedom and more equality.

Hangzhou, China. 2015. On both a global scale as well as for many young Chinese, everything in adult life starts in university. Although lasting only a few years, it often has a long term influence on their lives as they establish their future aspirations, form relationships, and create an identity. University students as a group are a large representative of Chinese youth; as the next generation, they will be the ones to develop and revitalize China.

Over the course of one week, two 25-year-old Royal Roads University students from Victoria, B.C., Canada, follow and record two 24-year-old students from Zhejiang GongShang University, Hangzhou, China. Royal Roads University students and filmmakers: Lindsay Marie Stewart and Lindsay Seguin. Zhejiang GongShang University students: Fang (Vera) Yayun and Zhang Zenghui.

I love the simple life. I think happiness is the most important thing because the speed of life is very rushed. A lot of people speed up their rate of life. I want to balance my life and my interests.
— Fang (Vera) Yayun, Zhejiang GongShang University student

 
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I know how to be a student, but I do not know how to be a responsible adult - the supporter of the family.
— Zhang Zenghui, Zhejiang GongShang University student

The Outline of Reform and Development of China’s Education states that in 1994 the Chinese government made education universal in China through a 11.6 billion yuan investment and execution of the Compulsory Education Program in Poor Areas. According to China’s Ministry of Education, the number of Chinese college graduates per year has nearly tripled in the last half-decade, going from 1.5 million in 2002 to 4.1 million in 2007. In 2001 a study by the China Youth and Children Research Center and China Youth and Children Development Fund carried out a survey with a return rate of 94.72% from 37 universities throughout China called the “New Students - Survey of the Development Status of Contemporary College Students.” It focused on six aspects including basic situation, value orientation, learning status, contact with others, attitude toward love and state of employment. The Chinese Economy Series, Chinese Youth in Transition suggests that China’s higher education system is undergoing a shift from “elitist education” to “mass education.” Literature on Chinese youth suggests there is a current shift from unified choice to diversified choice; from seeking ideal benefit to real benefit; and from the accumulation of knowledge to the cultivation of abilities.